THE BEST WAY TO LEARN DVDA

If you are looking for the best and quickest way to learn Sony's DVD Architect, you have come to the right place.

How To Make A DVD With Sony DVD Architect  is a crash course in learning DVD Architect. It is the simplest,  most effective, and smartest way to understand the program. In just under two hours, it walks you through the complete process of making a professional-looking, standard-definition, menu-based DVD. It also contains four bonus sections including one which explains how to burn a high-definition Blu-ray disc.

The truth is DVD Architect is not the easiest program in the world to learn and if it is not explained properly, it can take even longer to learn and understand. In fact, Top 10 Reviews notes that DVD Architect "has an extraordinarily steep learning curve."  And we would not dispute that, but fortunately, this DVD takes most of the key concepts, breaks them down, and explains them simply.

You can search the Internet for hours, but you will not find any resource that is this affordable, comprehensive, and to-the-point.  

If you already have the DVD and found it helpful or useful, then your kind words and positive reviews posted online and elsewhere are sincerely and deeply appreciated. Also, if you have any suggestions or comments, we are happy to hear them.

Thank you for your support.

 

 

 

BROADCAST SAFE COLORS

If you are rendering a DVD, it is important to be sure that your DVD's output falls within the color safe range.

We happened to notice that in Sony Vegas Pro, it shows the Y' as being between 16- 135, and we realized that had to be a typo, which it turned out to be.

It is strangely comforting to know that even professional software makers can make a small mistake every now and then, and to their credit, they quickly acknowledged it.

 

 

 

LONG LIVE THE DVD

When it comes DVD-authoring programs, there are not a lot of choices out there. In fact, one competitor to DVD Architect is or should we say was  Adobe Encore, which is on life support and is no longer being supported by Adobe. And even though we don't use Adobe Encore, we are sad to see these programs disappearing. Adobe is apparently pulling its support because it does not believe in the future of DVDs and wants everyone living (and paying to be) on cloud and streaming services.

We don't agree with Adobe's assessment and hope that DVDs will continue to prosper, especially for independent filmmakers and content producers.

One reason DVDs are not going away any time soon is that movie studios make a ton of money on them. If it were not for DVDs, then movies would be financially dead as soon as they were pulled from theaters. Of course, sales are down, but the market for DVDs is far from dead. Just walk into any Wal Mart and look at those bins of DVDs for sale. And most certainly, movie studios do not want to give up on that cash opportunity. In much the same way, some have also predicted the death of books with eReaders, but books are still being published and bought. And like a DVD, a book is a tangible item in your hand and represents the ultimate in portability.

Another reason that DVDs are still around is that not everyone, including people like myself, wants to pay for yet another online service. And who knows? If the economy turns south and people have to cut costs, a streaming service might be one of the first things to go. Plus, depending where you are or where you live, you might not even be able to stream your videos, for example, in a remote area or on a flight. Isn't it nice to be able to watch your movie or DVD uninterrupted on a portable player?

In addition, many people have invested heavily in buying DVDs and have no reason to abandon the format. DVDs last a long time and DVD players are dirt cheap. Why replace something that isn't broken and still serves its purpose? There isn't one really.

There are more reasons than this but probably the most important one is that DVDs give independent filmmakers and content creators a way of producing and distributing content on their own without any outside influence. If you try to post your content online, it is subject to the rules of the hosting service, and if, for whatever reason, the hosting service doesn't like your content, it will be taken down. If you think about that, that's censorship and control, not freedom.

If you think of freedom as the ability to say what's on your mind free from constraints, then DVDs represent true freedom of expression. For instance, if you want to make a documentary about an issue that is important to you but might not be popular with everyone, you still can. You don't need anyone's permission. You can make your movie, burn your DVDs and sell them or give them to your friends, family, and anyone else you want. You don't have that same freedom with posting your content online. 

In a sense, the ability to make DVDs is like the printing press of the digital age. And what's more, DVDs do not have to rely on the Internet---they are off the grid. They can be distributed freely, privately and publicly, on a grass roots, word-of-mouth level. And that is independence. That is freedom.

So don't give up on DVDs. Many people have been saying they are on their way out, but reports of their demise have been greatly exaggerated. Make no mistake about it. DVDs remain one of the best ways to distribute your content.

But be aware, little by little, we could be losing the ability to make DVDs. Hopefully that day never comes and those who believe in this format can and should continue to support those companies that support DVD makers. There is much more at stake than we might realize.

 

 

BLU-RAY AUDIO CAN GO TO 448kbps

If you are rendering a Blu-Ray DVD, please note that you can actually increase the data rate on your audio from 192 kbps to 448 kbps. Normally, DVD Architect will try to recompress your audio if it is higher than 192 kbps, but this is not the case when it is a Blu-Ray disc. For AC-3 audio, on the Render As page in Sony Vegas Pro, you would need to go to the Dolby Digital AC-3 Pro option, click Customize Template, then increase the data rate to 448 kbps. The Dolby Digital AC-3 Studio option does not allow you to increase the data rate and is locked at the usual default of 192 kbps. Dolby Digital Stereo is 192 kbps and 5.1 is 448 kbps.

It is also worth noting that we recently attempted to render a Blu-Ray disc with AC-3 stereo audio rendered at 192 kbps and DVD Architect gave a warning that it was going to recompress the audio. When we re-rendered the audio at 448 kbps, DVD Architect cleared the warning message. We have had instances where DVD Architect did not issue a recompression warning for Blu-Ray AC-3 audio at 192 kbps, but if you happen to get a warning about audio recompression with those settings, then try rendering the AC-3 audio at 448 kbps to see if that takes care of it. 

 

 



CHANGING BUTTON ORDER

The first button placed on a menu page always gets assigned to the number 1 or default position. In the number 1 position, the menu page's highlight will always appear over that button no matter where it is positioned on the page. An issue can arise if you happen to move the number 1 button out of its first position because the highlight can then appear to be oddly placed. Since this is easier to show than explain, we created a short You Tube video to show how to fix this problem. We hope you enjoy it!

If you have purchased the DVD or are a subscriber to our You Tube channel, you can email us a request for a topic you'd like to see on our channel and we will do our best to come up with it.